Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank Skyscrapers and Hurricanes – Thinking Out Loud

You are searching about Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank, today we will share with you article about Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank is useful to you.

Skyscrapers and Hurricanes – Thinking Out Loud

In areas that experience hurricanes or very strong winds, it seems that we need to be a little more familiar with wind flow modeling as each building is constructed or as a downtown redevelopment master plan is planned. This is a very serious question. A lot of studies have been done in Chicago “The Windy City” and other places because the air flows between buildings and because of Bernoulli’s principle the air accelerates to break through, between buildings, which is worse.

Winds of more than 230 mph were recorded in Guam during the tropical typhoon and were the highest on record at the time. My parents were actually in a high rise apartment complex when this happened and the building was fine, but flying debris is dangerous and if and when the pieces fall off the building they really fly and cause more damage. Hurricanes in Miami, the remnants of Wilma caused serious damage downtown, much of it caused by the tornadoes that accompany such storms.

Urban airflow modeling is quite serious and needs to be studied, adding an extra building can change everything, there are CAD CAM programs to study this airflow, they are also used indoors to model airflow in homes and businesses to reduce energy needs for, say, air conditioning and the like. These are extremely useful tools and reliable models for building miniaturized wind tunnels.

Also keep in mind that a hurricane, typhoon or cyclone (depending on where you are) will travel in a certain direction (counter clockwise) and opposite in the lower hemisphere depending on the location, but either way the storm as it passes , blowing winds in all directions as it moves by, you are naturally hit from different angles. Do you see the problem and why is it such a critical problem?

What about 28-foot storm surges? Can you imagine the damage something of this magnitude will cause? That would be CAT five (plus) on Saffir Simpson, you’re talking about quite a low pressure storm in the center, that would be “Rita” or “Wilma” plus at landfall and you said what happened in Cancun. Serious stuff. God help your wonderful Hilton or Club Med, see you there. It is a tsunami-type event similar to the one that followed the Sumatra earthquake.

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshs.shtml.

Let’s face it, 30 feet is 30 feet, if you don’t stop that water it will wipe out anything in its path that isn’t protected. In the future, cities will be built by generating energy from ocean waves, but can this infrastructure survive a catastrophic storm? After all, you don’t want a wave to knock out your power and cause the event to deteriorate, but I think engineers can design a system that can sit still and withstand this type of storm by using fluid dynamic strategies, computer modeling, and allowing them to become neutral and waves over as long as the storm passes.

To protect your city from a hurricane, you need to worry about wind models and storm wave modeling, and you may need barriers in the ocean to slow it down as well. Ridge system etc. and prevent erosion, because if you have one storm that wipes out your barriers and you get another one, you’re toast. See the issues – let’s think about it, it’s possible!

Video about Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank

You can see more content about Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank

If you have any questions about Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 7944
Views: 83352002

Search keywords Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank

Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank
way Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank
tutorial Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank
Can You Have Too Much Flow In A Reef Tank free
#Skyscrapers #Hurricanes #Thinking #Loud

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Skyscrapers-and-Hurricanes—Thinking-Out-Loud&id=642992

Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart Book Notes, A Book Summary on the Book Eat That Frog by Brian Tracy

You are searching about Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart, today we will share with you article about Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart is useful to you.

Book Notes, A Book Summary on the Book Eat That Frog by Brian Tracy

Have you ever heard the phrase “eat that frog?” I never did until I read the book Eat That Frog, 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time, by Brian Tracy.

According to Brian, eating your frog is about tackling your most important, daunting tasks, and getting them done. The concept is similar to how you eat an elephant…one bite at a time. Brian’s main point is that you eat your most ugliest frog first, the next ugliest, and so on, until all your frogs are done. When you “eat your frog,” you feel empowered, happier, energized, and are more productive, i.e., you get more done.

The principles Brian shares in his book are principles he has picked up from 30 years of studying time management and has incorporated into his own life. Brain says that time management is life management, so these principles apply to any aspect of your life, especially your business when you’re just getting started and working on it part time. The idea is to take control over what you do and choose the important tasks over the unimportant. This is a key determinate of success.

Here is a summary of each principle Brian covers in his book.

Principle 1: Set the Table

This principle is about determining what you want to accomplish. It’s about getting clarity about your goals and objectives. One of the biggest reasons people procrastinate is vagueness and confusion about what they want to do. Brian introduces his first Rule of Success: Think on paper. Do you know that people who have clear written goals accomplish 5 to 10 times more than people who don’t?

Brian has a seven step formula for setting and achieving goals:

1. Decide exactly what you want to do (one of the worst time wasters is doing something well that doesn’t need to be at all).

2. Write your goal down. Writing your goal down crystallizes and put energy behind it because it becomes real.

3. Set a deadline on you goal. This gives you a sense of urgency with a beginning and end.

4. Make a list of everything you think you need to do to achieve the goal. A visual picture give you a path to follow and increases the likelihood of success.

5. Organize the list into a plan by priority and sequence. You can draw a map of your plan like a flow chart to help you visualize the steps.

6. Take action immediately. “Execution is everything.”

7. Resolve to do something everyday that takes you closer to your goal. Schedule your activities and never miss a day.

Having clear written goals affects your thinking and motivates and drives you into action. Written goals stimulate creativity, release energy, help you overcome procrastination, and give you enthusiasm. Think about your goals and review them everyday and take action.

Principle 2: Plan Each Day in Advance

This is basically making a to-do list. Just like eating an elephant, you eat a frog one bite at a time. Break you task down into steps. “Thinking and planning unlock your mental powers, trigger you creativity, and increase your mental and physical energies.”

The better you plan, the easier to overcome procrastination, to get started, and to keep going. Brian claims that every minute you spend planning will save as much as ten minutes in execution. So if you spend 10 to 12 minutes planning, you’ll save at least 2 hours (100-120 minutes) in wasted time and effort – very impressive.

Brian’s introduces the Six P Formula for this principle: Proper prior planning prevents poor performance. His tips are: All you need is paper and pen. Always work from a list – if something new comes up, add it to the list. Keep a master list of everything. Make a list for different purposes. Keep a monthly list, which you make at the end of each month for the following month. Keep a weekly list, which you make at the end of the week for the following week. Keep a daily list, which you make as the end of the day for the following day.

The lists feed off each other. Check off items as you complete them. Checking the items off gives you a visual record of accomplishment and motivates you to keep going.

Follow the 10/90 Rule of personal effectiveness, which says if you spend the first 10% of your time planning and organizing your work before you begin, you’ll save 90% of time getting the work done when you start.

Principle 3: Apply the 80/20 Rule

This principle says that 20% of your activities will account for 80% of your results, even when all your activities take the same amount of time to do. The activities that give you the most return on your investment are your frogs. Where you focus your time is the difference between being busy and accomplishing something. You want to eliminate or spend less time on your low-value tasks. Your most valuable tasks are the hardest and most complex, but give you the most bang for you time, so ask yourself if the task is a 20% task. Brian’s rule here is “Resist the temptation to clear up small thing first.”

Once you begin working on your hardest task, you become motivated to complete it. “A part of you mind loves to be busy working on significant tasks that can really make a difference. Your job is to feed this part of your mind continually.”

Thinking of starting and finishing an important task motivates and helps you overcome procrastination. An important fact to remember is that “The amount of time required to complete an important job is the same time it takes to do an unimportant job.”

Principle 4: Consider the Consequences

“The mark of a superior thinker is his or her ability to accurately predict the consequences of doing or not doing anything.” Thinking through the consequences gives you an idea if an activity is important and is a way to determine the significance of a task. Any important task will have long-term potential consequences.

Dr Edward Banfield, from Harvard University, concluded that “the long-time perspective is the most accurate single predictor of upward social and economic mobility in America” (a rare trait in our instant gratification world). Your attitude towards time has an impact on your behavior and choices. Thinking about the long-term impact will help you make better decisions, thus, one of Brian’s rules: “Long-term thinking improves short-term decision making.”

Having a future orientation (5, 10, 20 years out) will allow you to analyze choices and will make your behaviors consistent with the future you want. Ask yourself, “What are the potential consequences of doing or not doing this task?”

Brian’s follow-on rule is “Future intent influences and often determines present actions.” The clearer you are on your future intentions, the better clarity on what to do at the present moment. Having a clear understanding of your future intention helps you evaluate a task, delay gratification, and make the necessary sacrifices in the future. Be willing to do what others aren’t so you can have what others want later…greater rewards are in the long-term.

Dennis Waitley, a motivational speaker says, “Failures do what is tension-relieving while winners do what is goal achieving.” Make important tasks a top priority and start them now. Time is passing anyway, so decide how you will spend it and where you want to end up. Thinking about the consequences of your choices, decisions, and behaviors is the best way to determine your priorities.

Principle 5: Practice the ABCDE Method Continually

The ABCDE method is a priority setting technique to help you be more efficient and effective. The premise behind the technique is that the more you invest in planning and setting priorities, the more important things you will do and do faster once you start.

You start by listing everything you have to do for the day and categorize everything into A, B, C, D, or E.

An “A” is something that is very important that you must do or there will be serious consequences (this is your frog.) A “B” is something you should do that has mild consequences (Brian calls these your tadpoles). A “C” is something that would be nice to do but there are no consequences. A “D” is something that you can delegate to someone, which frees up time for you to work your A. An “E” is something you can eliminate because it makes not difference at all.

Discipline yourself to work your A and stay on it until it is complete. If you have more than one task in each category, label the most important A1, the next A2, etc., and do the same for the other categories. Never do a B before an A, or a C before a B.

Principle 6: Focus on Key Result Areas

This principle is about focusing on what you are working towards. Every job can be broken down into “key result areas,” which are results you must achieve and for which you are responsible. For example, the key result areas for management are planning, organizing, staffing, delegating, supervising, measuring, and reporting.

Identify your key result areas and list your responsibilities for each. Then grade yourself on a scale of 1-10 in each result area. Where are you strong? Where are you weak? Are you getting results or under performing? Brian’s rule for this area is “Your weakest key result area sets the height at which you can use all your other skills and abilities.” Essentially, your weakest area limits your overall performance.

This leads to another reason people procrastinate-they avoid things where they have performed poorly in the past. Procrastination doesn’t usually happen in an area you’re good in. Ask yourself, “What one skill, if I developed and did in an excellent fashion, would have the greatest positive impact in my career” (or life, or business)? Ask those around you. Then set a goal to improve in that weak area.

Principle 7: Obey the Law of Forced Efficiency

“There is never enough time to do everything, but there is always enough time to do the most important thing.” Brian’s rule that applies here is “There will never be enough time to do everything you have to do.” (That’s a hard pill to swallow and something we probably subconsciously know but don’t accept.) A fact Brian states in his book is that the average person is working at 110-130% of capacity, which means you will never get caught up. So that means you need to stay on top of your most important responsibilities.

People create more stress for themselves when they procrastinate and put themselves under the pressure of a deadline. When you’re up against a deadline, you tend to make more mistakes. The questions to ask yourself on a regular basis are:

1. What are my highest value activities?

2. What can I, and only I, do that, if done well, will make a real difference?

3. What is the most valuable use of my time right now?

The answers to these questions will identify your biggest frog at the moment. “Do first things first and second things not at all.”

Principle 8: Prepare Thoroughly Before You Begin

This principle means preparing and having everything you need ready before you begin your task. Have everything you need readily available in front of you. Remove everything that’s not going to help you. Create a workspace you’ll enjoy working in.

Principle 9: Do Your Homework

“Learn what you need to learn so that you can do your work in an excellent fashion.”

Other reasons for procrastination are feelings of inadequacy, lack of confidence, and lack of competence in a key area of a task. To overcome these issues, work on your development. Professional development is one of the best time savers there is. Brian’s rule here is “Continuous learning is the minimum requirement for success in any field.” Keep on improving your skills.

Principle 10: Leverage Your Special Talents

Identify your unique skills and commit yourself to becoming good in these areas, then apply your knowledge and skills (no one can ever take those away). Ask yourself, “What am I really good at?” “What do I enjoy the most about my work?” “What has been most responsible for my success in the past?” “If I could do any job at all, what job would it be?” Focus on your best energies and abilities.

Principle 11: Identify Your Key Constraints

Limiting factors affect how quickly and how well you get your task done. They are the critical path or choke point to achieving your goal. Identify your limiting factors by asking yourself what is holding you back, then focus on alleviating those factors as much as possible. Getting rid of those limiting factors usually brings more progress in a shorter time than anything else.

The 80/20 Rule applies here too-80% of the constraints are internal, only 20% are external. Those constraints can be as simple as a thought or belief. Accept responsibility and get rid of your constraint.

Principle 12: Take it One Oil Barrel at a Time

A saying about tackling anything is “by the yard, it’s hard, but inch by inch, it’s a cinch.” Taking an “one oil barrel at a time” is the same concept. Brian talks about a trip in Algeria through the Sahara Desert. Because of the vastness of the desert and the lack of landmarks, the French had placed empty oil barrels on the road as markers. The barrels were placed 5 kilometers apart, so you could always see the next barrel. So the meaning of this principle is to go as far as you can see, and when you get there, you can see farther. Step out on faith, have confidence, and the next step will become clear.

Principle 13: Put Pressure on Yourself

The intent behind this principle is to take charge of you life before you end up waiting for a rescue that will never come. Be a leader, someone who can work without supervision, which according to Brian is only about 2% of people. Set standards for yourself higher than you would for others and go the extra mile.

This is all about self-esteem, which is your reputation of yourself, as defined by psychologist Nathaniel Brandon. Everything you do affects your self esteem. Push yourself and you’ll feel better about you.

Principle 14: Maximize Your Personal Powers

Physical, mental, and emotional energies make up your personal performance and productivity. So guard and nurture your energy level. Rest when you need to. When you’re rested, you get much more done.

A general rule is that productivity tends to decline after about 8-9 hours. Identify the times you are at your best and use that time to work on your frogs. Take time out to rest, rejuvenate, eat well, and exercise.

Principle 15: Motivate Yourself Into Action

This principle is about controlling your thoughts and being your own cheerleader. Coach and encourage yourself. How you talk to yourself determines your emotional response.

How you interpret things that happen to you determines how you feel. How you feel can motivate or de-motivate you. Become an optimist and don’t let setbacks and negativity affect your mood.

“In study after study, psychologists have determined that ‘optimism’ is the most important quality you can develop for personal and professional success and happiness.”

Brian identifies 3 behaviors of an optimist.

1. Look for the good in every situation.

2. Seek the valuable lesson in every setback or difficulty.

3. Look for the solution to every problem.

When you visualize your goals and talk to yourself positively, you feel focused, energized, confident, creative, and have a greater sense of control and personal power.

Principle 16: Practice Creative Procrastination

This is a personal performance principle about putting off doing smaller, less ugly frogs. Ultimately, you can’t do everything (remember Principle 7, Obey the Law for Force Efficiency?), so procrastinate on low value activities (bonus: you get to choose which ones).

This is a matter of setting priorities, something you do more of and sooner, and setting “posteriorities,” something you do less of and later. The rule that applies here is “You can set your time and your life under control only to the degree to which you discontinue lower value activities.”

Say “no” to low value use of your time and life and say “no” early and often, because you don’t have spare time. Thoughtfully and deliberately decide what things you are not going to do right now. Avoid the unconscious tendency to procrastinate on the big, hard, valuable, important tasks.

You are responsible for evaluating your activities and identifying those that are time-consuming with not real value. Get rid of them or delegate them (um, sounds like Principle 5, Practice the ABCDE Method). Practice “zero-based thinking.” Ask yourself, “If I was not doing this already, knowing what I now know, would I get into it again today?” If you get a yes answer, it’s an “E.”

Principle 17: Do the Most Difficult Task First

This is the hardest, most difficult principle because you’re “eating your frog.” Brian outlines 7 steps to gain this skill (these steps are a nice summary of the some of the principles we have already covered):

1. At the end of the day/weekend, make a list of everything you have to do the next day. 2. Review the list using the ABCDE method combined with the 80/20 rule. 3. Select you A1 task, the one with the most severe consequences. 4. Gather everything you need to start and finish the task; get it ready to start the next morning. 5. Clear your workspace so you’re only ready to start your A1 task. 6. Discipline yourself to get up, get ready, and start the task without interruptions before you do anything else. 7. Do this for 21 days (creates the habit).

When you get into the habit of doing the most difficult task first, you’ll double your productivity in less than a month, and you’ll break the habit of procrastination.

Learn to say “Just for today,” as you’re developing your new habit. “Just for today, I will plan, prepare, and start on my most difficult task before I do anything else.”

Principle 18: Slice and Dice the Task

This principle is the “salami slice” approach to getting work done. Do one slice of the task at a time. Psychologically, it’s easier to do a smaller piece that to start on the whole job-like eating an elephant. We tend to want to do another slice when we get done with one. People have a deep subconscious need to bring finality to a task, the “urge to completion.” We feel happier and more powerful when we start and finish a task because endorphins are released-the bigger the task, the bigger the sense of accomplishment.

This approach is also known as the “Swiss cheese” method; you punch a hole in the task by spending a specific amount of time on the task.

Principle 19: Create Large Chunks of Time

This principle is about scheduling time to work on large tasks. To make significant progress on your tasks, you need blocks of high-value, high productivity time. The key is to plan your day in advance and schedule fixed blocks of time, especially for things you don’t enjoy doing. Make an appointment with yourself (sounds a lot like Principle 2, Plan Each Day in Advance).

Eliminate distractions and work nonstop. “Deliberately and creatively organize the concentrated time periods you need to get your key jobs done well and on schedule.”

Principle 20: Develop a Sense of Urgency

The basis of this principle is to be action-oriented. A sense of urgency is an “inner drive and desire to get on with the job quickly and get it done fast.” Take the time to think, plan, and set priorities, then work them. Create a mental state of “flow,” which is the “highest human state of performance and productivity.”

In the “flow” state, you feel elated, clear, calm, efficient, happy, and accurate. Everything you do seems effortless. You function at a higher plane of clarity, creativity, and competence. You are more sensitive and aware.

Developing a “sense of urgency” triggers the flow state. Race against yourself; develop a “bias for action.” Develop a fast tempo which goes hand and hand with success.

When you become action-oriented, you trigger the “Momentum Principle of Success.” You end up using less energy to keep moving than the energy it takes to get started. The faster you move, the more energy you have, and the more you get done. Repeat to yourself, “Do it now!” When you find yourself distracted, tell yourself, “Back to work!”

Principle 21: Single Hand Every Task

This principle is about concentrating single-mindedly on your frog until it’s done, which is the key to high level performance and personal productivity. Hard, concentrated work precedes every great achievement. You can reduce the time to finish a task by 50% or more when you concentrate single-mindedly, according to Brian.

Starting and stopping can increase the time to finish a task by an estimated 500% because you have to get reacquainted with the task and overcome inertia to get started again. When you stop, you break the cycle and move backwards. Develop momentum by getting into a “productive work rhythm.” “The more you discipline yourself to working non-stop on a single task, the more you move forward along the ‘efficiency curve.'” You get more high quality work done in less time.

Success requires self-discipline, self-mastery, and self control. Elbert Hubbard defines self-discipline as “the ability to make yourself do what you should do when you should do it, whether you feel like it or not.” Starting, persisting, and finishing a task is a true test of character, will, and resolve. Persistence is self-discipline in action. You end up liking and respecting yourself better. You shape and mold your character and become a superior person.

Conclusion

There you have it, 21 principles for overcoming procrastination so you can “eat your frog.” As a result of integrating these principles into your work habits, you will be happy, satisfied, feel a sense of personal power and effectiveness, and will become a great success. Fortunately, all this principles can be learned through repetition. As a recap, here they are:

1. Set the table.

2. Plan every day in advance.

3. Apply the 80/20 rule to everything.

4. Consider the consequences.

5. Practice the ABCDE method continually.

6. Focus on key result areas.

7. Obey the Law of Forced Efficiency.

8. Prepare thoroughly before you begin.

9. Do you homework.

10. Leverage your key special talents.

11. Identify your key restraints.

12. Take it one oil barrel at a time.

13. Put the pressure on yourself.

14. Maximize your personal powers.

15. Motivate yourself into action.

16. Practice creative procrastination.

17. Do the most difficult task first.

18. Slice and dice the task.

19. Create large chunks of time.

20. Develop a sense of urgency.

21. Single-handle every task.

I recommend you read the book. Don’t let the number 21 scare you. The book is an easy read and Brian gets straight to the point-no extra fluff. You’ll gain a better understanding of the principles, and the better you understand them, the better you’ll be able to apply them to your business and life. The benefit is you get to successfully “Eat that frog!”

Video about Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart

You can see more content about Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart

If you have any questions about Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 1322
Views: 10418658

Search keywords Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart

Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart
way Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart
tutorial Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart
Can You Have Multiple End Points On A Flow Chart free
#Book #Notes #Book #Summary #Book #Eat #Frog #Brian #Tracy

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Book-Notes,-A-Book-Summary-on-the-Book-Eat-That-Frog-by-Brian-Tracy&id=2047222

Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl Wedding Customs Throughout History From Bridal Party To The Origin Of Engagement And Wedding Rings

You are searching about Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl, today we will share with you article about Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl is useful to you.

Wedding Customs Throughout History From Bridal Party To The Origin Of Engagement And Wedding Rings

Origin of members of the wedding party

During the period of captive marriage, the groom was helped by loyal tribesmen and close friends within the tribe to invade enemy territory to capture his bride. While he fled with her, his friends remained behind to defend or fight the bride’s outraged relatives. Such were the first orderlies and the wedding party.

Maids and bridesmaids, as we know them today, can also be traced through the centuries in Saxon England. The elder among them accompanied the bride for several days before the wedding. She was especially responsible for making the wedding wreath, decorations for the wedding feast and for dressing the bride. The relative predecessors of today’s bridesmaids were guards who protected the girl from capture. Other examples of the use of “bridesmaids” were the ten witnesses required by the Roman wedding ceremony.

Flower girls and ring bearers at modern weddings are a remnant of fertility rituals practiced by various peoples. The bride was often accompanied by a small child, which was said to symbolize a fruitful union.

The origin of the procession

The origins of the procession apparently evolved from ancient and medieval wedding processions. Among the Athenians, the ritual began with morning offerings to Zeus and Hera, and especially to Artemis, who was said to be averse to marriage. Then at night the bride was taken to the groom’s house. She was riding in a wagon pulled by a pair of mules, and she was sitting on a couch that resembled the arrangement between her husband and one of his close friends. As the wedding procession advanced, it was greeted and joined by friends carrying wedding torches and singing songs.

In the Middle Ages, the procession was particularly colorful. Cheerfully dressed ministers sang and played at the head of the procession. A young man followed, carrying the bride’s cup, which was a chalice or vessel of silver or silver, decorated with gilt, rosemary, and ribbons. Then the bride walked in, accompanied by two bachelors and about a dozen knights and pages. Next came the girls carrying the bride’s cake, followed by the girls with wheat wreaths. Then the bridegroom appeared, led by two little girls, walking in the midst of his close friends, including his “best man.” He was followed by relatives and less intimate friends. Finally, some distance away and seemingly uninterested in the celebration or the ceremony, the father of the bride appeared!

The origin of engagement and wedding rings

As far as can be discovered, the wedding ring originated in caveman times in a reed cord that a man tied around his wife’s waist so that their spirits would become one. The Egyptians are believed to have introduced the first metal rings, which were probably made of gold. In Egyptian hieroglyphics, the circle represented eternity. Christians started using wedding rings in the 9th century, which has been preserved to this day.

There is a legend that Tubalcain made the first wedding ring for Prometheus out of iron. Iron symbolized permanence, unwavering perfect harmony.

Early Romans used iron wedding rings. Even in the 19th century, it was customary for poorer English people to wear a ring at church. And today, when a very poor Irishman cannot buy a wedding ring, he borrows one! The Puritans banned rings as they considered their use to be pagan.

Engagement rings have followed much the same pattern as wedding rings over the years. The caveman first wove grass or reeds around the ankles or wrists of the chosen bride. These were awkward and were abandoned in favor of strands of grass tied around the fiance’s finger.

The earliest allusion to engagement rings in Christian literature is said to be in the writings of Tertullian at the end of the second century AD. The Romans are credited with introducing engagement rings to the ancient Germans and are mentioned in the Law of the Visigoths in 642 AD

Inscriptions on wedding or engagement rings also had their origins in previous centuries. As early as 400 BC n. no. the Greeks had dedications inscribed in their rings, and medieval French suitors were particularly fond of it.

The ring ritual of the past was interesting. During the ceremony, the ring was placed on an open book. The priest then sprinkled him with holy water and blessed him. Then the bridegroom raised it with his thumb and the first two fingers of his right hand and placed it on the bride’s thumb and said, “In the name of the Father.” Then he transferred it to the first finger and said, “And the Son.” Then he changed it to the other finger when he said, “And of the Holy Ghost.” He finally placed it on her third finger with an “Amen.” It didn’t seem to matter whether the ring was on the bride’s right or left hand. Sometimes it was placed on the right at a wedding, and on the left at a wedding.

Video about Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl

You can see more content about Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl

If you have any questions about Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 5506
Views: 30926200

Search keywords Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl

Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl
way Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl
tutorial Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl
Can You Have A Ring Bearer Without A Flower Girl free
#Wedding #Customs #History #Bridal #Party #Origin #Engagement #Wedding #Rings

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Wedding-Customs-Throughout-History-From-Bridal-Party-To-The-Origin-Of-Engagement-And-Wedding-Rings&id=782331

Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer Brazilian Wedding Traditions

You are searching about Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer, today we will share with you article about Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer is useful to you.

Brazilian Wedding Traditions

Brazilian weddings are rich in tradition and culture. They are often very expensive and the bride’s parents usually pay for the wedding, but this is becoming less common due to the overall cost. Brazil is a Christian nation and therefore has several customs similar to other Christian regions; but there are some traditions that differ.

Wedding rings

Unlike in the US, engagement rings are not as important and instead the couple exchange wedding rings. The rings are placed on the right hand and then switched to the left hand during the wedding ceremony. It is customary for the bride and groom to write each other’s names on the ring. It is considered bad luck if a ring falls during the exchange of rings, and it is said that the marriage would not last if this happened.

Kitchen shower

Unlike the usual bridal shower held in other countries, in Brazil they hold what is known as a kitchen shower. It used to be a small gathering of the bride’s close friends to meet and give gifts that the bride would use for her kitchen. However, the gatherings are getting bigger and bigger and not even men can join them.

Wedding party

A Brazilian bride can wear a dress of any color she wants, but white is the tradition. However, it is customary to wear golden shoes. Matching bridesmaids is considered bad luck; therefore, no two people can wear the same color. Unlike the US and other European countries, which choose their grooms months in advance, in Brazil a groom can wait until the last hour before choosing his own. Wedding parties often consist of three couples who are very close to the bride and groom, but are not necessarily in a relationship.

Before the ceremony

It is a tradition that the day before the wedding, the Brazilian bride goes to the spa with her family to relax. There, they can get a message, as well as a haircut, hairstyle and make-up before the big day. But when the wedding is real, it is tradition for the bride to be at least 10 minutes late, as this is considered good luck. Sometimes the groom and other guests have to wait several hours before the bride finally arrives on her big day.

Wedding ceremony

The wedding ceremony takes place like most Christian weddings. However, there are some differences in that the bride has two flower girls accompanying her, one who distributes the flowers and another who is more like a ring bearer. The bride and groom will then recite their vows and then switch rings from right to left hand to symbolize the change from engagement to marriage. Most wedding ceremonies can last up to an hour, but sometimes it can last longer.

Wedding reception

A wedding reception is a big party where the guest and the newlyweds drink, dance and talk. One tradition is for the couple to exchange gifts for their parents. Often the bride takes off her shoes and places them in the middle of the dance floor. While the guests dance around, they will throw money into the shoes to help support the financial future of the newlyweds. Instead of a wedding favor, it is customary to present the guest with the Brazilian dessert bem casado (which means “well married”).

If you are interested in learning more about Mexican wedding traditions, http://www.singlemantravel.com

Video about Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer

You can see more content about Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer

If you have any questions about Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 8441
Views: 8001819 0

Search keywords Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer

Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer
way Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer
tutorial Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer
Can You Have A Flower Girl Without A Ring Bearer free
#Brazilian #Wedding #Traditions

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Brazilian-Wedding-Traditions&id=9193328

Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer Wedding Planning Timeline Checklist

You are searching about Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer, today we will share with you article about Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer is useful to you.

Wedding Planning Timeline Checklist

Congratulations on your engagement. Now is the time to get to work and plan the wedding of your dreams. With a little preparation (and a sense of humor!), there’s no need to act like a bridezilla.

Here’s a checklist to help you stay sane.

9-12 months before the wedding

  • Announce your engagement.
  • Plan what type of wedding you want – formal, informal, day or evening, number of guests
  • Choose your wedding date.
  • Set Your Budget – Discuss who is responsible for which expenses before making any plans. You should include your parents and future in-laws in this discussion. Remember to treat them with respect. Every penny they provide is a gift!
  • Make a guest list – don’t forget to include your parents and future mother-in-law in this discussion.
  • Speak to an official – priest, minister, rabbi, justice of the peace, etc.
  • Book your ceremony and reception venues.

6-9 months before the wedding

  • Choose a wedding dress
  • Choose your attendants – maid/matron of honor, best man, bridesmaids, ushers, flower girls and ring bearer
  • Choose a photographer
  • Choose dresses and accessories for the bridesmaids (remember to be nice and listen to their suggestions and concerns).
  • Choose a caterer (if necessary)
  • Hire a band or DJ
  • Book your florist

4-5 months before the wedding

  • Plan fittings for yourself and companions (don’t forget the florist)
  • Reserve all rental items needed for the ceremony and reception
  • Finalize the guest list
  • Ordering stationery – wedding invitations, thank you notes and wedding programs
  • Address invitations or hire a professional calligrapher
  • Plan a rehearsal dinner – set a date, time and location. (This dinner is usually hosted by the groom’s parents.)
  • Arrange accommodation for out-of-town guests.
  • Start planning your honeymoon (The groom usually agrees on this after you BOTH decide where to go.) Don’t forget to take any passports or travel documents you may need.
  • Sign up for gifts.
  • Shopping for shoes and accessories (don’t forget to break in your shoes before the wedding)

2-3 months before the wedding

  • Order a wedding cake
  • Order party favors
  • Order all necessary decorations
  • Reservation of all transport for the wedding day (if necessary)
  • Buy wedding rings
  • See a lawyer to write any necessary wills or prenuptial agreements

5-8 weeks before the wedding

  • Shopping for gifts for bridesmaids
  • Send out invitations (a map to help your guests find the ceremony and reception locations is a good idea).
  • Visit a hairdresser to find out what style you want for your hair. (Tip: Never change your hair color or style right before your wedding. All changes should be made at least 3-4 weeks before).
  • Take a formal wedding portrait
  • Send wedding announcements to newspapers (if necessary)
  • Change the name and address on your driver’s license, social security cards, insurance policies and bank accounts
  • Reserve a wedding dress for the groom, usher, ring bearer (usually done by the groom).
  • Send rehearsal dinner invitations (if needed)
  • Get legal permission
  • If necessary, take blood tests in your country
  • Plan a luncheon for the bridesmaids

2-4 weeks before the wedding

  • Confirm ceremony details with officiant
  • Arrange the final fitting of your dress and bridesmaids dresses
  • Make your final flower selection
  • Finalize plans for the rehearsal dinner
  • Confirm details with all service providers – it’s a good idea to give them a written timeline of your wedding day.
  • Contact guests who have not yet responded to your invitation
  • Pick up the wedding rings
  • Meet with your photographer to discuss the specific photos you want to capture.
  • Meet with your DJ or band to confirm the music you want to play
  • Remind all attendants (male and female) when to collect their wedding attire.
  • Buy any special accessories or makeup you want your companions to wear.
  • Designate ceremony seating for any special guests (give list to ushers).
  • Plan reception seating – write names on place cards.

Wait… You’re almost done! Last week

  • Pick up the wedding dress
  • Determine the final number of guests and inform the caterer
  • Arrange for a “get-way” car at reception
  • View the schedule of events and last minute deals with all service providers.
  • Confirm your honeymoon reservations
  • Pack for your honeymoon

Breathe in…..It’s finally here….Your Wedding Day!!!!

  • Give rings to the best man and maid of honor (if there is no ring bearer)
  • Give the best man money to pay the officiant after the ceremony
  • Relax and have fun!!! All your hard work and planning has paid off.

Video about Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer

You can see more content about Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer

If you have any questions about Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 6483
Views: 95019226

Search keywords Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer

Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer
way Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer
tutorial Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer
Can You Have A Flower Girl And No Ring Bearer free
#Wedding #Planning #Timeline #Checklist

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Wedding-Planning-Timeline-Checklist&id=269667

Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines Always Have Poor Circulation? The Number 1 Reason You Have Poor Blood Flow Circulation

You are searching about Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines, today we will share with you article about Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines is useful to you.

Always Have Poor Circulation? The Number 1 Reason You Have Poor Blood Flow Circulation

Do you often complain that you always have poor circulation? If so, then you might be surprised what the number 1 reason you have poor blood flow through your body really is. I’ll also give you 2 easy suggestions on how to start improving your circulation today!

 

2 quick tips to improve poor blood circulation

#1 – hawthorn: This herb is an excellent way to reduce low blood pressure and poor circulation. You will need to take it for at least a month to start seeing changes, but most people will find that they want to continue using it for longer as the results are almost always visible. The tea form is fine, but the best way is to consume raw ground berries daily in a shake. Search for organic hawthorn powder online and find what you are looking for.

#2 – Cayenne: An amazingly versatile herb that can do more for blood pressure than you might imagine. In fact, it has even been reported to be able to stop a heart attack and cause lacerations and wounds to instantly heal when nothing else could! It promotes circulation and warms the body if your body needs it. It will actually help a person with high blood pressure to balance and lower their blood pressure. An amazing herb that you shouldn’t be without. Try to strike gold again with raw organic cayenne powder, also make sure you have a power of at least 200,000 heat units.

Cause no. 1 for poor circulation!

It may surprise you, but about 80% of people are currently walking around with a yeast infection in their body and don’t even know it. It causes terrible health problems for 1/3! The culprit is the yeast that lives in all of us, known as candida albicans. This yeast will overgrow under the right circumstances and cause a host of issues such as poor circulation, fatigue, brain fog, sinus and respiratory issues, depression, anxiety, heart palpitations… Oh, and of course it’s the number 1 cause of all digestive problems!

If you are interested in learning more about whether this is the cause of your health problems. I highly recommend taking a quick online candida test or questionnaire to rule out a bigger problem for you.

Video about Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines

You can see more content about Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines

If you have any questions about Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 8813
Views: 43054166

Search keywords Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines

Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines
way Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines
tutorial Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines
Can You Have A Blood Flow Problem In Your Intestines free
#Poor #Circulation #Number #Reason #Poor #Blood #Flow #Circulation

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Always-Have-Poor-Circulation?-The-Number-1-Reason-You-Have-Poor-Blood-Flow-Circulation&id=3159840

Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot Take Your Flower Garden to the Next Level With Antique Roses

You are searching about Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot, today we will share with you article about Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot is useful to you.

Take Your Flower Garden to the Next Level With Antique Roses

For most of the twentieth century, gardeners overlooked antique roses in favor of their more modern cousins, and perhaps because there are so many different types of roses to choose from. But recently, antique roses have seen a resurgence in popularity and are fast becoming a must in every garden. Proven survivors with limitless versatility, they combine historical interest, vivid color, unforgettable fragrance and unique form in one package and as such Antique Roses are becoming indispensable for modern gardeners.

A wide range of opportunities

Antique Roses offer gardeners a wide range of opportunities for creativity. They are versatile and practically limitless in their potential uses… they can be used as a background for a flower bed, to form its spine or even to create massive color displays at the front of a bed.

Their versatility allows them to be used with other plants and flowers in the garden, creating a stunning experience. Even those who grow roses in containers and do not have space for a garden can easily survive. Antique roses can climb, ramble, trail and form bushes of any size. They can bloom continuously over several seasons or bloom spectacularly in just one season.

Many types

The would-be gardener can choose from many types of antique roses. They come in dozens of shapes, colors and functions. Below are some examples of some of the more common types.

The species

Type Antiquities are those that are usually found in nature. Vibrant and disease resistant, they can thrive with little care. Some varieties of Species Roses are Cherokee Rose, Swamp Rose, Mermaid Rose and Yellow Lady Banks Rose.

China

Descendants of Asian roses brought from China by European explorers, Chinese roses are incredibly long-lived and can grow quite large if cared for properly. China roses, which easily tolerate heat, are popular among southern gardeners. Some varieties of China roses include Old Blush roses, Archduke Charles roses, and Mutabilis roses.

Noisette

Noisette Roses can be called the first truly ‘American’ rose species and are usually graceful multi-blooming shrubs and climbers with elegant, fragrant flowers. Some varieties include Lamarque Roses and Crepuscule Roses.

Hybrid bourbon

Bourbon hybrid roses, created on the French island of Bourbon, have an old-fashioned rose colored quarter flower. Bourbon roses are a husky shrub and have a strong fragrance and are heat and drought tolerant. Some varieties include Souvenir de la Malmaison roses and Zephirine Drouhin roses.

tea

Tea roses have a distinctive green tea scent and are upright shrubs with bronze-red foliage. Their flowers are spectacularly colored, pink, red, yellow or white. Some varieties include Sombreuil Roses, Duchess de Brabant Roses and Mrs. Dudley Cross Roses.

No matter which antique rose variety you choose for your yard, garden or home landscaping ideas, you can be sure it will be a strong and lasting addition to your collection and will thrive rain or shine, winter or summer. There are many varieties to choose from, each with its own characteristics, but all of which share the antique rose characteristics of beauty and hardiness, and will be a boon to your garden or home.

Video about Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot

You can see more content about Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot

If you have any questions about Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 9587
Views: 26233332

Search keywords Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot

Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot
way Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot
tutorial Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot
Can You Grow A Rose Bush In A Flower Pot free
#Flower #Garden #Level #Antique #Roses

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Take-Your-Flower-Garden-to-the-Next-Level-With-Antique-Roses&id=2337550

Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement National Flower of Finland – Lily-of-the-Valley

You are searching about Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement, today we will share with you article about Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement is useful to you.

National Flower of Finland – Lily-of-the-Valley

The lily of the valley is the national flower of Finland. This flower is known for its sweet and strong scent. Finland has many other beautiful things and this lily of the valley flower adds to its beauty. Just as Jean Sibelius defined Finland as a romantic place in many of his stories, this special flower is also considered a symbol of love and purity. Lily of the valley means purity and is considered a pure flower in the category of flowers. In addition, adding this flower to any bouquet makes it more attractive, and if you grow it in the garden, it adds to the beauty of the garden.

General information about Lily-of-the-Valley

This particular flower is considered the symbolic flower of Finland. It can be easily identified by its good smell and shape, which is a bell-shaped flower drop. The white lily of the valley looks like a wedding bell. The shape of this flower and its soothing fragrance make it an excellent choice when it comes to wedding decorations and bridal bouquets. Adding these flowers to country gardens is a great idea and adds to the beauty and soothing scent of the garden. The lily of the valley blooms in the spring and has a long-lasting beauty. The lily of the valley is extremely popular at weddings, as it is a symbol of purity.

How to grow a lily of the valley

Lily of the valley makes a great bouquet and is often included in summer flower delivery bouquets as it suits the time of year perfectly. But if you have cool summers, you can easily grow your own lily of the valley. These temperate plants are cold weather and shade tolerant and can survive in virtually any soil condition. Lily plants grow up to twelve inches tall and bloom with beautiful white bell-shaped flowers in the spring that last all summer.

If you want to plant these flowers, you can plant them in early spring or fall. Since Finland has a cold climate, the lifespan of these flowers is extended and due to the climate, these flowers can last with very little care and maintenance. In a warm climate, where summers are very hot and humid, it is difficult for these flowers to survive. In hot climates, these flowers die very quickly, so they need to be replaced every year.

Video about Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement

You can see more content about Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement

If you have any questions about Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 3835
Views: 30681046

Search keywords Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement

Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement
way Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement
tutorial Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement
Can You Grow A Rose Bush From A Flower Arrangement free
#National #Flower #Finland #LilyoftheValley

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?National-Flower-of-Finland—Lily-of-the-Valley&id=2431081

Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden Beauty and the Beast – Trumpet Vine, Rose of Sharon, Sumac – Why Grow These Shrubs? It’s a Paradox

You are searching about Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden, today we will share with you article about Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden is useful to you.

Beauty and the Beast – Trumpet Vine, Rose of Sharon, Sumac – Why Grow These Shrubs? It’s a Paradox

Trumpet Vine, Rose of Sharon, September. Why would anyone want to plant these shrubs in the landscaping of a pool, patio or outdoor living space? Each of them is a beast that can never be fully tamed, a beast that will require diligence and persistence to control and keep at bay.

The answer to this question lies not in their animal qualities, but in their beauty. This is a paradox worth examining.

Beauty and the Beast is a classic fairy tale based on paradox. Paradox is a literary term that is briefly defined as the juxtaposition of two seemingly contradictory or conflicting images or ideas that ironically do not contradict or conflict; instead, the paradoxical terms together form a startling new perspective or truth about their subject. Beauty and the Beast shouldn’t fall in love, but they do, and their love sheds new light on the nature of relationships and love itself. Paradox, however, is not just a literary term; it is a reality of life, a complexity that adds interest and beauty to whatever aspect of life it manifests. This reality includes the arrangement of outdoor living space.

Yes, trumpet, rose of Sharon and rue are all beasts, but they are also beauties worth fighting for. However, it is important to understand the dark side of their nature before committing them to any landscaping project.

All three of these bushes share the same beast-like tendencies. They are predators with a herd mentality that always wants to expand, conquer and dominate new hunting grounds. Simply put, if allowed, they will spread everywhere. They grow outward from the place of original planting; they will also appear all over the yard at considerable distances where we least expect or even want them. Allowing them to settle in any new location will make them much more difficult to control. Constant vigilance will be required. This is not a war that can be won in the end, but a battle that will be fought again and again. But remember that gardening, like life, is a journey, and most of its greatest rewards come from overcoming the obstacles along the way, not from reaching the final destination.

So why grow trumpet, rose of Sharon and rue? It’s very simple, because everything is beautiful and everything is worth the effort.

The trumpet vine is a climber, similar to ivy, that can be grown over any structure. Bright orange, cone or trumpet shaped flowers will attract buzzing birds and provide breathtaking entertainment. This vine can turn an ordinary chain link fence into a living privacy wall that is as attractive as any hedge, but less demanding on space. Grown on a trellis, it can be used as a room divider on a patio or deck. You can create an inviting entrance to your outdoor living space by growing vines over a cedar trellis, or arrange a row of these covered trellises along a path to create a shaded walk from one outdoor room to the next. Place a garden bench, porch swing, or glider in the middle of this path for a romantic retreat. One section of the pool deck can be covered with a simple pagoda overgrown with trumpets to provide a shady escape from the sun deck whenever you want. This covered pagoda could hold some comfy adirondack chairs, another swing, or a dining table for poolside meals. This vine can also curl around and up a single stake to form a small flowering umbrella tree specimen for the yard or garden. Either of these possibilities makes trumpet vine worth fighting for control.

Then the rose of sharon is a small tree and a member of the hibiscus family, a bad cousin perhaps, but a hardy one. It will survive and thrive in cooler climates in northern states and Canada where hibiscus will not. Its flower is somewhat smaller and less showy than that of the hibiscus, but still beautiful and very abundant, sprouting from the ends of the branches from mid-summer to autumn, when many other garden flowers begin to fall. Shades of purple dominate, ranging from pink tones to lighter mauve and deep lilac; and some beauties are bright white with a dark red heart. Trees may be allowed to grow into the center of a yard or garden; they can also be cut back and trimmed into an inverted cone shape, which gives them the appearance of a giant vase of flowers when in full bloom; finally they can even be grown close together in a row to create an attractive hedge. So the Rose of Sharon is also worth the effort to keep.

Finally, say hello to low sumac. These fast-growing trees are often seen growing in ditches and swampy areas, and along the sides and medians of major highways. Many consider them to be mere weeds or shrubs, unworthy of any serious garden or landscaping of a well-designed outdoor living space. Some of us exclaim: NOT LIKE THIS! A closer look reveals some unique and attractive features. In the spring, the new growth branches have a soft, hairy or downy texture that resembles the flakes or antlers of young bucks. The flowers are large corncob-shaped clusters in a deep brown or russet color reminiscent of a tropical fruit that appear in late summer and often last until it snows. The leaves are long, pointed, green ovals that grow along both sides of the young branches, often weighing them down a bit to give a drooping appearance; in autumn, when the colors change, they range from banana, through orange to bright pomegranate. In summer, when these leaves are dark green and drooping, the branches take on the appearance of a palm tree, or at least something similar to that found in climates where palm trees do not grow. The fact that they grow so quickly and often in an unusual way allows them to be trimmed and shaped as the owner wants, much like a bonzai tree; they can be grown to resemble tall or short palm trees, or even made to take on a windswept appearance borrowed from a northern lake or cliff. There are also more sophisticated varieties that have been bred to have even furrier branches, split leaves like Japanese maples, and bright yellow leaves. That’s why no gardener, landscaper, or homeowner should be afraid to give the low sedge an honest thought before dismissing it as nothing more than a weed and a nuisance.

To conclude in his classic novel A tale of two cities, Charles Dickens said of life in France before the Revolution: “They were the best of times; they were the worst of times” – another famous paradox. Well, having one or all of these three shrubs – trumpet, rose of Sharon and rue – in your garden or outdoor living space can be just that: the best of times and the worst of times. All are beauties and all are beasts. This duality must be accepted; the journey that follows will be a reward in itself.

Video about Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden

You can see more content about Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden

If you have any questions about Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 9056
Views: 95598916

Search keywords Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden

Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden
way Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden
tutorial Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden
Can You Grow A Japanese Maple In A Flower Garden free
#Beauty #Beast #Trumpet #Vine #Rose #Sharon #Sumac #Grow #Shrubs #Paradox

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Beauty-and-the-Beast—Trumpet-Vine,-Rose-of-Sharon,-Sumac—Why-Grow-These-Shrubs?-Its-a-Paradox&id=6571203

Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar Evergreen Shrubs And Hedges Are Important, Cold Hardy Landscape Specimen Plants

You are searching about Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar, today we will share with you article about Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar is useful to you.

Evergreen Shrubs And Hedges Are Important, Cold Hardy Landscape Specimen Plants

In addition to their landscape importance, trees are also important shrubs that grow in our gardens, parks, landscape foundations, street borders and commercial landscapes. Thousands of different species of shrubs are grown to decorate lawns, yards and borders, but only a few species are available for purchase at your local nursery for planting and growing. Many shrubs are selected and grown based on the smart purchase of flowering hedges, frost evergreens, non-flowering hedges, berry and deciduous shrubs. Many shrubs glow with brightly colored leaves in fall and winter.

Although it is common for some shrub stems to die due to shading, they will regenerate with new shoots; and like trees, shrubs live for years and are considered good property, a long-term investment, and a permanent fixture in the landscape.

Typically, a privacy hedge planting will take four to five years to mature to the point where the privacy screen is very sturdy and dense enough to hide whatever is behind it.

Some shrubs thrive in dry soil; others in wet soil, but most shrubs and hedges fall in between and need well-drained growing areas. All other possible growing extremes are important for planting shrubs and hedges, such as elevation, shade, exposure to wind and relative soil fertility. Azaleas, for example, grow well in the shade of most trees, including pines, and will quickly decay and soon die if planted to grow in full sun. Azaleas need organic matter incorporated into the soil to thrive, and proper soil acidity (pH) is necessary for azalea plants to live. Pine straw is often effective for protecting azaleas without weeds. Long rows of flowering azalea plants are often dramatic when planted under pine trees as the azalea flowers display their blooming flowers. The shallow root system of azaleas requires abundant watering during dry periods to ensure many azalea flowers in the spring after a summer drought.

Small evergreen shrubs

Evergreen shrubs are an important planting choice to ensure the presence of green in the dark winter days. Many gardeners want an evergreen shrub as a hedge to maintain privacy when the cold weather arrives. Anise, Illicium florianum grows in small hedges in resorts such as Sea Island, Georgia, and in summer exotic red flowers and candies rise from the leaves. Acuba japonica variegata ‘Gold Dust’ is also called the Gold Dust plant. Acuba is an interesting low shrub for planting and growing next to brick buildings. Cleyera, Ternstroemia gymanthera, is an interesting shrub for coastal areas, as Cleyera bushes are very tolerant of salt water spray, and the waxy green leaves have a unique tropical look in the landscape. Boxwood, Buxus microphylla asiaticum, is also tolerant of salt water and has dense color in zones 5-9. Boxwood is one of the most important and popular shrubs you can buy in the US, especially as a tidy, clean grower, boxwood is not a fast grower, requiring many years to reach 3 feet tall. Boxwood plants are usually planted in rows along walkways. Larger boxwood plants do well in group plantings in front of buildings

Eleagnus, Eleagnus pungens, is one of the fastest growing shrubs and makes an excellent barrier hedge or privacy fence that can grow up to 10 feet tall. Eleagnus is salt water tolerant and can be grown in containers in commercial locations. Interstate highway landscaping is full of large groups and plantings of Eleagnus, Eleagnus pungens, shrubs to reduce automobile fumes and truck highway noise.

Holly bushes are remarkably diverse, highly adaptable and versatile in the landscape. The most popular thistles are: Burford Holly, Ilex cornuta; Carissa Holly, Ilex cornuta ‘Carissa’; dwarf Chinese thistle, Ilex cornuta; dwarf Japanese thistle, Ilex crenata; Helleri Holly, Ilex crenata; Needlepoint Holly, Ilex cornuta ‘Needlepoint’; Sky Pencil Holly, Ilex crenata ‘Sky Pencil’; Savannah Holly, Ilex x attenuata; Stokes Dwarf, Ilex vomitoria ‘Stokes Dwarf’; dwarf thistle, Ilex vomitoria; Weeping jaupon, Ilex vomitoria pendula.

Japanese aralia, Fatsia japonica, is most often called Fatsia. In landscapes, Fatsia are often planted and grown in large groups near shaded house entrances or under shade trees for that bold tropical look. Fatsia can be planted as a large specimen plant, or Fatsia will grow as a shrub in containers as a houseplant. Philodendron selloum is often used as Fatsia and can grow into a large, attractive specimen plant on slender, woody trunks (stems). The Philodendron hybrid, Xanadu, is also used as Japanese aralia, Fatsia and Philodendron selloum, but is mostly used as an indoor or outdoor plant. The waxy, deeply ribbed green leaves are very cold hardy, and even if the philodendron is grown outside in zones 5-10, it will spring back to life from strong roots when it freezes to the ground.

Pittosporum tobira can be grown as an outdoor plant or as a shrub in a container. Pittosporum plants have annual bright green leaves and do best in shady areas with low light. The flowers are small, white and very fragrant, like aromatic crushed leaves. Florists use stems and leaves as fillers in flower arrangements. Pittosporum shrubs are not fast growing, but over time they can form an excellent privacy hedge that blocks out car noise and exhaust emissions. Because Pittosporum tobira shrubs are saltwater tolerant, these shrubs are often used in landscaping in Sea Island, Georgia. Large specimens of Pittosporum tobira are used as evergreen trees, subtly giving an exotic, tropical look. Pittosporium tobira ‘Variegata’ has colorful white and light green leaves with fragrant white flowers that bloom in summer. The variegated leaf form of Pittosporum tobira is not scorched by strong sunlight, like most variegated shrubs.

Large evergreen shrubs

Large evergreen shrubs sometimes grow into small eclectic trees after many years. These large evergreen shrubs provide the garden with specimen appeal, privacy and evergreen, cold-hardy color. Also called Carolina Sapphire, Cupressus glabra ‘Carolina Sapphire’, Arizona cypress is a fast-growing evergreen that can grow 20 to 30 feet tall with fine-textured, silver-blue leaves. The leaves in very hot areas grow threadlike and will survive drought or stress well.

Arborvitae, Thuja occidentalis, is an American native evergreen shrub that can grow almost anywhere in the United States. The dark green leaves of Arborvitae, Thuja occidentalis, may turn yellow, orange, or chestnut in winter, but the green color returns in cold hardiness zones 2 – 8 in spring. Other species of arborvitae are: Emerald, Thuja occidentalis ‘Emerald’; little giant, Thuja occidentalis ‘Little Giant’; Little Golden Giant, Thuja occidentalis ‘Little Golden Giant’; Aurea Nana, Thuja occidentalis ‘Aurea Nana’;

The blue Italian cypress, Cupressus sempervirens ‘Glauca’, will be considered one of the most important specimens of evergreen trees used in landscapes. The trees are not fast growing, but are cold hardy in zones 7 – 11. The dense leaves are branched and grow into a large column 3 – 4 feet wide. Italian cypress can grow up to 40 feet outside, and large container-grown Italian cypress can be shipped quickly by semi-truck or UPS. Italian cypress, Cupressus sempervirens ‘Glauca’ can draw architectural attention to large buildings. Italian cypresses are often planted along commercial banks bordering large walkways or memorial gardens.

Leyland cypress, Cupressocyparis leylandii, is a fast-growing shrub most often planted as a privacy hedge, but in many cases can grow into a large Leyland cypress tree specimen that can reach 130 feet. The Leyland cypress bush (tree) is a fast-growing intergenetic hybrid. Erosion control can be quickly achieved by planting these vigorous Leyland cypress bushes so that the roots are quickly driven into the ground and cool the soil.

Podocarpus macrophylla and Podocarpus nagi are the most commonly cultivated Podocarpus shrubs. Clipping podocarpus is a common plant practice to create a sculpted appearance. Podocarpus can be grown as a border plant for walkways, but after many years it grows into a 10-foot, small, evergreen tree. Saltwater and cold hardiness of zones 7-10 make Podocarpus the best choice for any landscape garden purchase.

Wax myrtle or bayberry, Myrica cerifera, usually grows as a native American plant in woodlands, but nursery-grown plants will provide fast-growing cover that spreads by underground shoots. Birds and wildlife love this plant for nesting and seeking protective cover. The waxy, gray berries are fragrant and are commonly used to scent wood-scented candles. All parts of wax myrtle bushes are fragrant and grow to block out noise and harmful car fumes. Very old wax myrtle plants grow into exotic small trees that are aromatic specimens in the landscape. Wax myrtle bushes, Myrica cerifera, are a commonly cultivated naturalized plant that is enthusiastically used as a saltwater and cold tolerant hedge or landscape tree at a well-known resort hotel in Sea Island, Georgia.

Copyright (c) 2006 Patrick Malcolm

Video about Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar

You can see more content about Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar

If you have any questions about Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 2495
Views: 80204567

Search keywords Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar

Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar
way Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar
tutorial Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar
Can You Grow A Flower Out Of A Candle Jar free
#Evergreen #Shrubs #Hedges #Important #Cold #Hardy #Landscape #Specimen #Plants

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Evergreen-Shrubs-And-Hedges-Are-Important,-Cold-Hardy-Landscape-Specimen-Plants&id=323899