Can You Plant Flowing Quince From A Branch Of It Modern Fruit Trees Evolved From Ancient Historical Roots

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Modern Fruit Trees Evolved From Ancient Historical Roots

The rise and fall of ancient empires also developed in parallel with the establishment and destruction of advanced orchards of fruit trees. Ancient fruit trees such as olive groves increased the wealth and health of nations by feeding the population, providing nutritious olive oil to light the lamps of ancient houses at night, as food and medium for cooking, and for the purposes of anointing kings and queens. Olive trees would not be able to produce consistent crops if the gardeners who grow them did not provide a safe and peaceful growing environment. The original olive plantings grew slowly and could not produce satisfactory fruit until the trees matured for fruiting in 10 to 15 years. Even ancient warriors and kings knew very well that if they destroyed fruit plantations, they could neutralize enemy nations for many years. Ancient Greek soldiers either confiscated enemy orchards for their own future use or destroyed the trees if they intended to continue to prevent defeated nations from resuming agriculture and later returning as a future threat. The Romans fought the citizens of Carthage in North Africa and defeated them several times, and then again experienced attacks and invasions from Carthage. Finally, the Romans destroyed every building in the city of Carthage, leaving no stone unturned, and sprinkled salt to poison the farmland to prevent any rebuilding, as food could not be grown on salt-contaminated land.

Two centuries later, Israel destroyed 50,000 olive trees in Palestine, which is also located in North Africa, as was the city of Carthage, to prevent the Palestinian people from enjoying the fruit and wealth of the olive groves.

The Hebrew Bible records in the book of Genesis that the first fruits eaten by Adam and Eve were in the Garden of Eden; but they were forbidden to eat the fruit of the tree in the center of the garden, which grew on the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, but they ate the fruit anyway. Many Bible translators assume that this fruit was an apple, but other botanists say that the apple fruit was not known at the time – that the quince was most likely a forbidden fruit, the oldest relative of the apple. After eating this controversial fruit, Adam and Eve were banished from their paradise on Earth, and when they realized their nakedness, they covered their bodies with the leaves of the fig tree. King Solomon of Israel spoke poetically and in songs about his gardens, which grow luxuriantly with the fruits of the earth. Figs and fig trees are often mentioned in the Hebrew Scriptures, most profoundly when Jesus cursed a barren fig tree that died instantly when it did not produce figs to eat as he passed by.

Ezekiel 47-12: “All kinds of fruit trees will grow along the river banks, the leaves will never turn brown and fall off and there will always be fruit. Every month there will be a new crop – without exception! For they are watered by the river that flows from the temple. The fruit will be for food and leaves for medicine.”

Olive oil was used to anoint the kings of Israel. Olive trees are often mentioned in the Bible – the most memorable story being the Mount of Olives, under which Jesus prayed before his arrest in the Garden of Gethsemane, which led to his condemnation by Governor Pilate and the subsequent infamous crucifixion by the Romans. . Pomegranates were well known and respected by the Israelites, who carved images of the pomegranate fruit used to decorate the pillars of the Temple in Jerusalem. Perhaps the most famous fruit of the Bible was the grape, which grew in vineyards and was highly prized for consumption fresh, for drying as raisins, and for fermentation into wine and further into vinegar. There are many references in the Bible to grapes, grape products, and the wealth that vineyards provided to property owners. Many tropical fruit trees, such as citrus, jujube, banana and loquat trees, probably originated from Oriental origins such as China and India. It is also likely that stone fruits such as peaches, cherries, apricots, nectarines (smooth-skinned peaches) and plums, which contain a large seed in the center, originated in the Orient. Many botanists speculate that the fruits of the mulberry, fig, pomegranate, and apple may have originated in the territories of the Middle East.

There is no doubt that the oriental persimmon originated in China and spread to the Japanese mainland.

Several fruits are native to the Americas, and after the discovery of majhaw trees, red mulberry trees, guava trees, pawpaw trees, Chickasaw plum trees, and Ogeechee lime trees, much effort was made to improve these fruits by selecting superior cultivars and grafting. them on various cold-resistant substrates.

It is clear to those interested in the natural history of fruit trees that many fruits exist today because these ancient gardeners selected the seeds of favorable fruits and gradually planted the seeds, resulting in improvements in the fruit. Some of these fruit trees could be increased by vegetative rooting of twigs and branches or by growing multi-stemmed plants by division and replanting them in nursery gardens. Some fruit trees could not be increased by rooting or division, and seed planting gave unpredictable results. Some delicious sweet peaches with large juicy fruit could produce seed which, when planted, would produce a wide variety of flavors, shapes and sizes for the trees; some bitter or sour, some irregular in shape, some large or small. This unpredictable outcome of planting the seed of superior fruit trees finally defeated the art of grafting, which was well known and practiced, as evidenced by the historical accounts of the ancient Romans.

By examining the historical record of fruit trees in the Hebrew Bible, we discover that fruit trees nourished the first earthly man and woman in a fertile Garden of Eden in the place and birthplace of civilization – the Tigris and Euphrates Valley near the modern nation of Iraq. For a long period of history, man was banished from his earthly paradise, but today a gardener can buy his own wish list of fruit trees and experience his own man-made heaven under the eternal, ancient, beautiful sky.

Copyright 2006 Patrick Malcolm

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