Car Coolant Comes Out Over Flow Tube After Engine Off Regular Maintenance is Great For Your Car’s Wealth and Warranty

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Regular Maintenance is Great For Your Car’s Wealth and Warranty

If you’re like most people, your vehicle is one of the biggest investments you’ll ever make. You are very proud of your car: you insure it, wash it and service it. So nothing excites you more than the car you worked so hard for and saved up for so long to break down.

Your car not only gets you there safely, efficiently and comfortably, but has come to symbolize your personal independence, exemplifying the freedom to choose where you drive, how you drive and when you drive there. When your car is “in the shop” you start to realize how dependent you are on your vehicle.

Knowing a few basics about your vehicle and scheduling regular maintenance can save you money on repairs and keep it out of the garage for major repairs. For your convenience, we have collected some frequently asked questions and answers about car care.

Are my tires properly inflated?

The correct car tire pressure for a vehicle depends on the size and weight of the car, the type of car tires it uses, the load being towed and the type of driving the vehicle is intended for. The motor vehicle manufacturer places a tire pressure plate in each vehicle showing the correct tire pressure for that motor vehicle. This label is located on the inside of the passenger compartment door, inside the fuel tank door, or on the door pillar on the driver’s side (depending on the manufacturer). Most car manufacturers also list tire inflation levels in their owner’s manuals.

How often should I change the engine oil/filter?

According to car experts, regular oil/filter changes are the most important element in extending the life of a car engine. Most new automobiles have recommended oil/filter change intervals of 7,500 miles, and some new automobiles have recommended oil change intervals of 11,000 to 15,000 miles under normal operating conditions, with “normal” operation described as running the vehicle for at least 20 minutes at medium speed, with steady throttle and in a clean driving environment.

Short hops to the store, rush hour driving, driving on dirt roads and operating in bad weather are considered severe operating conditions that can cause impurities in the oil to build up quickly, causing increased wear on internal parts. shares. That’s why most car owner’s manuals and auto mechanics recommend changing the oil and filter every three months or 3,000 miles (whichever comes first) to ensure maximum engine lubrication while minimizing impurities in the oil. To find out the recommended oil change frequency for your vehicle, check your car’s owner’s manual or talk to your auto mechanic.

What can I do if my car overheats?

If you are driving at a normal speed on the highway and the car starts to overheat, turn off the air conditioning, turn on the heater and pull over immediately. A problem with the cooling system, such as low coolant, a clogged radiator, or a broken drive belt or burst hose, is likely to cause the vehicle to overheat at highway speeds. Once on the shoulder, turn off the car’s engine, open the hood and let the engine cool – at least 20 minutes. Once the boiling stops and the car’s engine cools down, look for obvious signs of trouble. DO NOT attempt to open the car’s radiator cap unless the car’s engine is off and the top of the radiator is cool. If there is no noticeable problem, such as a broken drive belt or a burst pipe, you can then add a mixture of coolant and water to the radiator or overflow tank, start the car and drive slowly to the service station.

How often should my car be serviced?

The term “tune-up” actually only applies to older cars without electronic ignition (pre-1981). These autos would generally require a tune-up every 15,000 – 20,000 miles and included changing the spark plugs, ignition contacts, rotor and distributor cap, and adjusting the ignition timing and carburetor.

In modern automobiles equipped with electronic ignition, fuel injection and computer control, the term “maintenance of engine performance” is a more accurate term. “Tweaking” these newer vehicles is a regulated process of inspection, computer diagnosis, testing, and tuning to maintain the car’s engine’s peak performance, maximum operating efficiency, and low exhaust emissions. Spark plugs, plug wires, sensors and modules can be replaced during this process. The frequency at which a newer automotive vehicle needs a tune-up depends more on driving conditions than mileage, and recommended tune-up frequencies vary between 30,000 and 100,000 miles, depending on the manufacturer. To find out how often your car needs a tune-up, check your owner’s manual or talk to your local car service provider.

Does my transmission ever need service?

Most auto care professionals advise changing the automatic transmission fluid and filter every two years or 24,000 miles to keep it in good condition. This is especially important if the car is more than five years old. Many automobiles older than five years require regular service less often, and some new automobiles have transmissions that do not require regular service during the life of the car.

However, bespoke service may not be suitable if your vehicle is driven heavily, tows a trailer, goes off-road or transports a motorhome. Under these conditions, the car’s fluid and filter may need to be changed more frequently – every 12 months or 12,000 miles – because the accumulation of dirt and moisture in the fluid can cause internal damage. Heat build-up can also be a problem. The harder a car’s transmission works, the hotter the fluid gets and the faster the fluid breaks down. To find out the recommended transmission service schedule for your vehicle, check your owner’s manual or talk to your local auto service provider.

Manual transmissions generally do not require regularly scheduled service, but they may require service due to worn clutch and pullout bearings and failed synchronizer gears. For specific manual transmission service information, check your owner’s manual or talk to your local automotive service provider.

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